droop


droop
i. A downward curvature of the leading edge of an airfoil to provide increased camber.
ii. A progressive decrease in RPM that occurs when a fuel control flyweight governor spring is extended and made weaker. It takes less fly-weight force to come to an equilibrium with the weaker spring force and consequently a lower RPM will result.
iii. The inability of the engine power to increase as the rotor pitch is increased, causing the rotor to slow down.
Droop compensator cam.

Aviation dictionary. 2014.

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  • Droop-E — B Slimm Birth name Earl Stevens, Jr. Also known as Lil E Born February 18, 1988 (1988 02 18) (age 23) in Vallejo, California Origin …   Wikipedia

  • Droop — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Constanza Droop (* 1965), Kinderbuch Illustratorin Fritz Droop (1875–1935), Schriftsteller und Journalist Henry Richmond Droop (1831–1884), englischer Mathematiker Hermann Theodor Droop (1879–1957),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • droop — [druːp] verb [intransitive] if prices, sales etc droop, they start to fall: • In Tokyo, share prices drooped during the Emperor s illness. * * * Ⅰ. droop UK US /druːp/ verb [I] FINANCE ► if prices, values, sales, etc. droop they gradually go down …   Financial and business terms

  • droop — vb Droop, wilt, flag, sag are comparable when they mean to sink or to lose in vigor, firmness, or freshness. Droop stresses a hanging or bending downward (as through exhaustion, discouragement, or lack of nourishment) {some of the watchers were… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Droop — (dr[=oo]p), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Drooped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Drooping}.] [Icel. dr[=u]pa; akin to E. drop. See {Drop}.] 1. To hang bending downward; to sink or hang down, as an animal, plant, etc., from physical inability or exhaustion, want of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • droop — [dru:p] v [Date: 1200 1300; : Old Norse; Origin: drúpa] 1.) [I and T] to hang or bend down, or to make something do this ▪ The plant needs some water it s starting to droop. ▪ His eyelids began to droop (=close, because he was sleepy) . ▪ Jessie… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Droop — Droop, v. t. To let droop or sink. [R.] M. Arnold. [1913 Webster] Like to a withered vine That droops his sapless branches to the ground. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Droop — Droop, n. A drooping; as, a droop of the eye. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • droop — droop; droop·ing·ly; droop·ing·ness; …   English syllables

  • droop|y — «DROO pee», adjective, droop|i|er, droop|i|est. 1. hanging down; drooping: »a droopy hat. 2 …   Useful english dictionary

  • Droop — (Drop), s.v.w. Schwingkran …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon


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